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If you aren’t taking fish oil or getting one to two servings of fatty fish in your diet each week, flaxseed oil may be a good solution to help supplement your diet with the omega-3 fatty acids you need.

flaxseed Cold Pressed Oil

Best Solution for

Research suggests that taking flaxseed oil daily for 16 weeks does not improve symptoms of mania or depression in children with bipolar disorder.

Research suggests that flaxseed oil does not lower blood sugar or improve insulin levels in people with type 2 diabetes.

Early research suggests that taking flaxseed oil daily for 3 months lowers total cholesterol in people with high cholesterol. However, this early research is not reliable. More high-quality evidence suggests that flaxseed oil does not reduce cholesterol levels in people with high cholesterol and high triglycerides.

Taking flaxseed oil daily for 3 months does not seem to improve symptoms of pain and stiffness, and has no effect on laboratory tests that measure the severity of RA.

What Flaxseed Oil Does

There is some evidence that taking flaxseed oil might improve attention, impulsiveness, restlessness, and self-control in children with ADHD.

There is some evidence that increasing the amount of linolenic acid in the diet can help to prevent hardening of the arteries. Flaxseed oil contains linolenic acid, and therefore some people suggest that flaxseed oil might prevent atherosclerosis. Though this assumption seems reasonable, there has been no research yet to prove it is correct.

Women who have higher levels of alpha-linolenic acid in their breast tissue seem to be less likely to get breast cancer. Scientists think that high intake of linolenic acid might protect against breast cancer. Flaxseed oil is one source of linolenic acid. However it is not known if increasing flaxseed oil intake will help to prevent breast cancer.

People with existing heart disease who consume more alpha-linolenic acid in their diet seem to have a lower risk of dying from heart disease. Flaxseed oil is one source of alpha-linolenic acid. However, research has not directly measured the effect of flaxseed oil intake on heart disease outcomes. It is also not known if flaxseed oil supplements have the same effects as flaxseed oil from food.

Some early research suggests that taking flaxseed oil might reduce irritation and symptoms of dry eyes. A specific product containing fish oil plus flaxseed oil (TheraTears Nutrition) might also reduce symptoms of dry eye and increase tear production.

There is inconsistent evidence about the effects of flaxseed oil for dry skin. Some research suggests that taking flaxseed oil by mouth with alpha-tocopherol daily for 12 weeks does not improve skin moisture in women with dry skin. However, other research suggests that taking flaxseed oil by mouth for the same length of time can improve skin moisture and roughness.

Lower-quality research suggests that alpha-linolenic acid, a chemical in flaxseed oil, does not improve muscle strength in older adults.

Early research suggests that taking a formula containing arginine, yeast RNA, and alpha-linolenic acid, a chemical in flaxseed oil, improves weight gain, but not immune function in people with HIV.

Early studies suggest that flaxseed oil supplements help to lower blood pressure in men with normal blood pressure, but high cholesterol. It is not clear if flaxseed oil lowers blood pressure in people with high blood pressure.

Research suggests that taking flaxseed oil for 6 weeks might lower triglyceride levels, but does not affect weight, blood sugar, or cholesterol levels in women with PCOS.

Consuming alpha-linolenicacid in the diet seem to be linked to a reduced risk of developing pneumonia. Flaxseed oil is one source of alpha-linolenic acid. However, research has not directly measured the effect of flaxseed oil intake on pneumonia outcomes. It is also not known if flaxseed oil supplements have the same effects as flaxseed oil from food.

Research is inconsistent on the effect of the flaxseed oil ingredient, alpha-linolenic acid, in prostate cancer. Some research suggests that high dietary intake of alpha-linolenic acid is linked with an increased risk for prostate cancer. Other research suggests high intake or high blood levels of alpha-linolenic acid is not linked with the overall risk of prostate cancer; however, extra alpha-linolenic acid might make existing prostate cancer worse. The source of alpha-linolenic acid appears to be important. Alpha-linolenic acid from dairy and meat sources has been positively linked with prostate cancer. Alpha-linolenic acid from plant sources, such as flaxseed or flaxseed oil, does not affect prostate cancer risk.

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